Year 9 Summer School

Unit: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1919-1939

1. The German Reich, 1871-1918

In our first lesson we will examine how Germany was formed in 1871, and how its creation influenced how it was ruled between 1871 and 1918. This will be the first introduction to some key concepts that will be revisited throughout the Germany course and will give us some insight into why these concepts were so vital to the narrative of Germany after the end of WWI.

2. The Russian Revolution, 1917

In today’s lesson we will be looking at the events leading to the Russian Revolution in 1917 and the impact this had on WWI. We will be examining some of the key features of communism in Russia and why this made other countries fearful of the spread of communism at this time.

3. How democratic was the Weimar Constitution?

In this lesson students will learn about the German surrender of WW1 and the origins of the Weimar Republic. Students will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the newly formed Weimar Constitution.

4. Why did the German people feel stabbed in the back?

In this lesson students will learn about the Treaty of Versailles and the social, political and economic impact it had on Germany. The origins of the Dolchstoss theory will also be explored. Students will then be able to assess the reasons for the unpopularity of the Weimar Republic.

5. Why was there a rise in political extremism in Germany after WW1?

Unit: Empowerment and equality

1. Introduction to this unit on empowerment and equality

In today's lesson you will be introduced to the new topic of empowerment and equality. We will be studying some empowering portraits in Art & Design and developing self-portraits for your personal empowerment theme.

2. Gabriel Garcia Roman (Part 1)

In today's lesson we are looking at the work of Gabriel Garcia Roman - Gay Icons. Initial editing of self-portrait photos painting over backgrounds and adding text.

3. Gabriel Garcia Roman (Part 2)

In today's lesson we are overviewing a range of mixed-media techniques to develop design variations inspired by Gabriel Garcia Roman's work.

4. Tim Okamura: Intro to grid portraiture

In today's lesson we are looking at Tim Okamura's portrait work. Developing a grid drawing from a portrait, stage 1: Outline drawing.

5. Tim Okamura: Shading and planning grid portraiture

In today's lesson we are reviewing Tim Okamura's work considering background and other finishing elements. Finishing grid with shading and other meaningful detail relevant to your empowerment idea.

6. Kehinde Wiley: An introduction

In today's lesson we are looking at Kehinde Wiley's portrait work, using Photopea to preview our portrait drawing against photographic backgrounds.

7. Kehinde Wiley: Painting preparation

In today's lesson we are looking at painting techniques, including how to make homemade gesso to prime and prepare surfaces for painting. We will be developing a painted test of our portrait drawing using gouache and planning next personal empowerment stages.

8. Composition ideas for final piece

In today's lesson we are going to look at ways of developing and testing our personal composition ideas. I will be developing a Tim Okamura-inspired personal response using the theme of Roller Derby.

9. Final Piece (Part 1)

In today's lesson we are starting our final piece/s inspired by the different artists. We will use digital techniques to visualise pattern with our designs. I will show you ways of transferring your designs to your primed surfaces.

10. Final Piece (Part 2)

In today's lesson we will complete our piece/s inspired by the different artists. I will be completing my two final patterned pieces using gouache and mixed-media.

11. Evaluation

In today's lesson we will learn to evaluate our work by understanding ways of discussing an image or an artist and how to feedback, annotate key impressions and overall feedback. You will get to rate the artists' work and explain your creative journey.


Photography

1. An introduction to photography

In this lesson, we will be learning some camera basics, observing and reflecting on photographs and their story, and investigating our space as photographers. This lesson includes some physical activity and equipment beyond pen, paper or pencil. Please make sure your child is adequately supervised.

2. Investigating light

In this lesson, we will be learning about two different types of light which we will investigate with our cameras in different ways. This lesson includes some physical activity and equipment beyond pen, paper or pencil. Please make sure your child is adequately supervised.

Unit: Networks 2

1. Website building blocks

We use web pages every day without questioning how they work. This lesson looks behind the curtain to help learners start to understand how web pages are constructed using HTML tags, and how they can be modified to display content as they wish.

2. Words are not enough

It is said that a picture paints a thousand words. Web pages that only use text are not going to be read for long on a screen. The use of images on web pages is important as it can bring them to life and help improve the reader’s experience. Students will explore the structure and operation of the img tag and understand how they can be used to ‘add’ images to web pages.

3. Taking shortcuts

Students will start to experiment with using CSS to format tags in a HTML document. They will then progress to apply their own formatting schemes to work that they have already created. As they become more experienced in the structure of CSS, students should look to extend their knowledge by researching the numerous attributes that can be controlled by CSS.

4. Searching the web

Like artists, web developers create works of art that they want people to see. There is so much content on the World Wide Web, that making sure your web page stands out can be difficult. Consider how people get to web pages. The start of the journey is usually a search engine, which people use to search for a few keywords and pick something from the list. The problem is, that list usually contains millions of different pages.

5. Tightening the web

Search engines index a huge number of web pages against an equally large number of possible search terms. Therefore, finding useful information can be quite tricky. If you understand how to carefully control what you search for, you are more likely to find what you want, instead of browsing the other millions of web pages you could look at.

6. The spread of the web

The growth of technology usage and the increased interconnection of it through the internet has given rise to both benefits and dangers. As with many things that have the potential to cause problems, the people who use this technology determine how much of a danger it can be. It would be beneficial to many of us for more people to use technology responsibly.

 

Unit: The Beauty of Baroque

1. To understand how a D major scale is built, and explore the Baroque piece Pachelbel's Canon in D

This lesson is an introduction to the Baroque period and its typical features. You will learn how the D major scale is built and played on a keyboard, before exploring the first two melodies of Pachelbel's Canon in D.

2. Performing countermelodies in Pachelbel's Canon in D: Responding to staccato and legato articulation markings

This lesson is all about melody. How and why do different melodies fit together? You will explore the degrees of the scale, play countermelodies from Pachelbel's Canon in D and then compose a countermelody.

3. To be able to perform and analyse more complex countermelodies in Pachelbel's Canon in D, exploring Baroque ornamentation

In this lesson, you will explore further melodies from Pachelbel's Canon in D. You will learn how performers of Baroque music vary and decorate their melodies, and then explore this practically.

4. To understand more about Baroque instruments, ensembles and textures

In this lesson, you will find out what makes music sound 'Baroque'. You will learn about Baroque instruments and how they differ to the ones we use today. You will explore methods of varying texture through counterpoint, and create your own melodic ideas to be played in canon.

5. Arranging Pachelbel's melodies into a 4-phrase melody

In this lesson, you will find out what a phrase is and how melodies can be divided up into smaller phrases. You will experiment with phrases from Pachelbel's Canon, and rearrange them into a longer melody of your own.

6. Reviewing the melodic and textural ideas in Pachelbel's Canon in D

In this lesson, you will recap all your knowledge of Baroque music so far. You will recap how to perform melodies from Pachelbel's Canon ensuring they are musical and stylistic. You will then learn how to use a Digital Audio Workstation to place these melodies into a contrapuntal texture.

7. Exploring Baroque ground basses and understanding bass clef notation

In this lesson, you will learn about the role of the basso continuo and ground bass in Baroque music. You will explore how to play the ground bass stylistically in a virtual Baroque ensemble!

8. Exploring the relationship between a bassline and chords

In this lesson, you will deepen your knowledge of the role of the basso continuo in Baroque music. You will explore how the ground bass and chords are related to one another, and learn how to play the chords of Pachelbel's Canon in a way stylistic to the Baroque period. You will then explore how to be the whole basso continuo in a virtual Baroque ensemble!

9. Composing a bassline

In this lesson, you will explore what makes a stylistic bass line. You will learn how to create your own bass line using the chords from Pachelbel's Canon, and build your confidence in inputting this into a Digital Audio Workstation.

10. To be able to compose a simple melody using notes from accompanying chords

In this lesson, you will learn how melodies are related to chords, and analyse melodies from Pachelbel's Canon in greater depth. You will learn how to use the ground bass from Pachelbel's Canon to create a ground bass of your own. You will then explore how to structure your melodies in a Digital Audio Workstation.

11. Composing a more elaborate melody that uses passing notes, Baroque rhythms and staccato/legato articulation

In this lesson, you will learn how to create a more sophisticated and stylistic melody. You will explore Baroque ornamentation and rhythms, and experiment with passing notes to create your own melody. You will then explore how to further manipulate this in a Digital Audio Workstation.

12. To explore other Baroque structures

In this lesson, you will learn all about different Baroque structures. You will explore how to combine your own ideas with Pachelbel's Canon in a variety of structures, such as binary, ternary and rondo.

13. To be able to arrange melodies within a Baroque structure

In this lesson you will consolidate your understanding of structure. You will learn how to create an arrangement of Pachelbel's (and your) melodies and place these in a sophisticated structure.

1. Describing people (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we use the 1st and 2nd persons singular of the verbs 'ser' and 'estar' to talk about what people are like in general, and right now.

2. Describing people (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will use the verbs 'ser' and 'estar' to talk about people in general, and right now.

3. Saying what people do (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be using present tense '-AR' regular verbs to say what people do.

4. Saying what people do (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about what people do, using present tense '-AR' verbs.

5. Talking about having more than one thing (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about having more than one thing, using the verb 'tener' in "I" and "you" forms, and singular indefinite articles (a).

6. Talking about having more than one thing (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about how to say you have more than one thing, using the verb 'tener' in "I", "you" and "s/he" forms, and plural indefinite articles (some).

7. Saying what people do and don't do (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about what people do and don't do, using 'no' and present tense '-AR' verbs.

8. Saying what people do and don't do (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we continue to talk about what people do and don't do, using 'no' and present tense '-AR' verbs.

9. Describing locations (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about places, using the singular definite articles 'el' and 'la', and using the verb forms 'hay', 'es' and 'está'.

10. Describing locations (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about places, using the plural definite articles 'los' and 'las', and the verb form 'son' (they are) with plural adjective agreement.

11. Talking about family (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about family, using the 1st person plural (we) and 3rd person plural (they) forms of the verb 'tener', together with adjective agreement after 'ser'.

12. Talking about family (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will be talking about family, and using nouns and adjectives together, focusing on placing adjectives after the noun.

13. Asking and answering questions (Part 1/2)

In this lesson we will be asking and answering information questions, using question words and the verb 'hacer'.

14. Asking and answering questions (Part 2/2)

In this lesson we will be asking and answering questions, using the question words 'cuánto(s)', 'cuál(es)' and 'quién(es)'.

Unit: Climate Change

1. What evidence do we have to show that the climate is changing?

This lesson will look at the range of evidence we can use to show the climate is changing, and the strengths and weaknesses of each one.

2. What are the natural causes of climate change?

This lesson will look at the natural causes of climate change including, orbital change, solar output, volcanic eruptions.

3. What is the greenhouse effect?

In this lesson you will learn how the greenhouse effect works, and how humans contribute to the enhanced greenhouse effect.

4. What are the possible effects of climate change?

During this lesson you will learn about the range of impacts climate change has on the environment and people, including sea level rise, coral reef bleaching and droughts.

5. How could climate change affect Bangladesh?

In this lesson you will look at how climate change is likely to affect Bangladesh, and why.

6. Why are future predictions about climate change uncertain?

This lesson will focus on how climate change can be predicted, and also why these predictions are uncertain due to population growth and other changes.

7. How can humans adapt to climate change?

During this lesson you will learn about the range of strategies humans can use to adapt to a changing climate, including changing farming practices, and coping with sea level rises.

8. How has Bangladesh adapted to the threat of climate change?

This lesson will look at the strategies Bangladesh has developed to cope with climate change and the impacts of it.

9. How can humans mitigate the effects of climate change?

This lesson will look at the wide range of ways humans can mitigate against, or minimise climate change.

Cell Biology

1. Cell biology review (Part 1)

23m video

2. Cell biology review (Part 2)

29m video

3. Cell cycle and mitosis

21m video

4. Stem cells and the use of stem cells

24m video

Electricity

1. Charge and current

35m video

2. Resistance of a wire

34m video

3. Series and parallel circuits

33m video

4. Filament lamps

33m video

5. Review of electrical circuits

26m video

6. Electrical power (Part 1)

33m video

7. Multi-Step calculations

26m video

Unit: Language Skills - Fiction - Reading

1. Approaching unseen fiction texts

In this lesson, we will look at Freytag’s Narrative Pyramid and the idea of ‘Four conflicts in Literature’ as ways of reading unseen fiction extracts. You will then have an opportunity to try out these ideas by applying this learning to an unseen fiction extract from H G Wells’ ‘The Time Machine’. You will be guided through the reading with prompt questions and after each section we will stop to review our ideas together. At the end of the lesson, there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

2. Considering structural choices

In this lesson, we will be looking at how to examine structural features. We will establish some key techniques writers use and the subject terminology you will need to help you explain your understanding of the text. We will return to our reading of our extract from The Time Machine by H G Wells and build on our reading strategy of breaking the text down into first / next / then / finally which is designed to help us move onto our structural analysis. Today, we will be working with a planning frame; we will break this down and look at how to complete this together. At the end of the lesson, there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

3. Analysing the writer's use of language

In this lesson, we will be looking more closely at a passage from H G Wells’ The Time Machine and examining the writer’s methods. We will look at how to respond to an analysis question; we will identify the focus of the question, select relevant ‘rich’ evidence and think about the importance of linking our selections. We will then look at a writing frame to support us in writing up our ideas before checking our responses and assessing our progress against a model answer. At the end of the lesson there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

4. Developing a personal response

In this lesson, we will be looking at how to develop our personal response to an evaluative question. We will start with a planning tool to help us unpick the question and explore our ideas. We will then sequence our material before undertaking a slow write response, working systematically through our plan together. At the end of the lesson, there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.


Unit: Language Skills - Fiction - Writing

1. Descriptive writing: Responding to a setting stimulus

In this lesson, we will be looking at how to plan effectively for a setting based descriptive task. We'll look at a range of planning tools to help us generate ideas and organise our material in a way which will have an impact on the reader. At the end of the lesson, there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

2. Descriptive writing: Responding to an 'image' stimulus

In this lesson we will be looking at how to respond to an image-based description task: either of a person, persons or objects. We will start by thinking about different character types and their function in written texts before experimenting with a number of stimulus images and techniques. At the end of the lesson there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

3. Use of symbolism in your writing

In this lesson, we will be exploring how symbolism can be used in our writing. We will start by looking at some potential symbols and generating our initial ideas. Then, we will look at how one of these symbols has been used by a student in a piece of writing before returning to our own work and developing our ideas further. At the end of the lesson, there will be a quiz to recap on our learning.

4. Narrative writing

In this lesson, we will establish the key features of narrative writing. We will plan a response together, thinking about what we want to achieve and then looking specifically at the introduction, climax and conclusion. You will then have an opportunity to review and refine your response by following our success criteria. At the end of the lesson, there will be a recap quiz to consolidate our learning.

9Y/T Band: Unit: Angles in polygons

1. Interior angles in a triangle

In this lesson, you will learn about the interior angles in a triangle, and how to find unknown angles in various types of triangles.

2. Categorising and defining polygons

In this lesson, you will learn about the key terminology involved in describing polygons, and begin to categorise polygons, based on certain properties.

3. Building shapes from triangles (Part 1)

In this lesson, you will learn how to arrange triangles to form polygons (part I).

4. Building shapes from triangles (Part 2)

In this lesson, you will learn how to arrange triangles to form polygons (part II).

5. Polygons and triangles

In this lesson, you will learn that the sum of the interior angles of a polygon can be found using triangles.

6. Generalising angles in polygons (Part 1)

In this lesson, you will learn how to generalise the sum of the interior angles in an n-sided polygon.