Year 10 Summer School

Unit: Elizabeth I: Meeting the challenge, 1558-1588

1. Why did Elizabeth’s background and character impact on her early reign?

This lesson considers Elizabeth's background and how her history prior to becoming Queen in 1558 would influence her rule.

2. How was Elizabethan society structured and what challenges did it pose?

This lesson looks at the hierarchical structure of Elizabethan society and why this was important for maintaining order during her reign. This lesson will also explore the challenges that different groups in society posed to Elizabeth.

3. How was Elizabethan government structured and what challenges did it pose?

This lesson examines the structure of Elizabethan government, both central and local. It will look at the different roles of advisors and how she used this structure to maintain control. It will also examine the potential challenges of this structure for Elizabeth.

4. How bad were Elizabeth's financial problems?

This lesson examines the finances of the Crown and the financial problems that Elizabeth faced.

5. What challenges did Elizabeth face from abroad?

This lesson examines the position of England in Europe and its traditional relationships with Spain, France, Scotland and the Papal States. It will then compare this to the position of England when Elizabeth came to the throne in 1558.

6. Explore the enquiry: How challenging were Elizabeth's early years?

This is an enquiry based lesson looking at the different challenges faced by Elizabeth in her early years and comparing them, before coming to a decision about which was the most challenging. Each pause point will support students in making a judgement about each challenge. The main task will allow students to share their thoughts on which challenge was the most important.

7. Why did the different religious groups concern Elizabeth?

This lesson examines the religious divide that Elizabeth faced when she inherited the throne in 1558. It looks specifically at Catholic, Protestant and Puritan beliefs specifically related to how church services should be conducted and how the church should be structured.

8. How did Elizabeth's settlement try to deal with the religious problems?

This lesson looks at Elizabeth's religious settlement of 1559 and examines how it affected, and how it was received by, the different religious groups in England.

9. How difficult was the settlement to enforce?

This lesson explores the reaction of the clergy and the laity to the religious settlement, and introduces an interpretation of the religious settlement. Students will consider whether they think the settlement was difficult to enforce and whether it was successful.

10. To what extent did Puritans and Catholics challenge the religious settlement?

This lesson introduces students to the reactions of the Puritans and Catholics to the religious settlement and questions the extent of their challenges in the early years of the reign.

11. How did the key foreign powers react to the settlement?

This lesson examines the reaction to the Elizabethan settlement abroad but also begins to look at Elizabeth's relations with France and Spain at the beginning of her reign and specifically how tension increased with Spain.

12. Why was Mary, Queen of Scots a problem?

In this lesson, students will look at the background to Mary Queen of Scots and her legitimate claim to the English throne. Students will consider how her arrival in England in 1568 posed a threat to Elizabeth and consider the options that Elizabeth had in order to deal with this threat.

13. Judgement lesson on the enquiries

This lesson will focus on answering the two enquiry questions for the unit. It will explore the biggest challenge to Elizabeth and then also question the extent to which her early years were a significant challenge.

14. What made the Northern Earls Revolt in 1569?

This lesson introduces two new enquiry questions about the years 1569-88 and how Elizabeth was challenged by plots and revolts during this time. It begins with examining the causes of the Northern Earls Revolt of 1569.

15. How significant a threat did the Revolt of the Northern Earls pose to Elizabeth?

This is the second lesson on the Northern Earls Revolt which explores the events of the revolt in more detail. It then considers the aftermath and why this was a turning point in Elizabeth's reign, as Elizabeth faced excommunication as a result of this. Students will then judge the significance of the revolt.

16. How threatening were Catholic plots after 1570?

Unit: Drawing Techniques

1. Embedding drawing fundamentals (with paper and pencil)

In today's lesson we will be looking at drawing fundamentals and image appreciation, focussing on pencil drawing. You will be working free-hand plotting and building techniques, as well as methods for shading and hatching quickly using traditional pencils & digital media.

2. Embedding drawing fundamentals (with pen and ink)

In today's lesson we will be looking at drawing fundamentals and image appreciation, focussing on stylisation of an image using pencil tracing, as well as fineliner and ink-free hand drawing skills.

3. Embedding drawing fundamentals: Tone & shadows

In today's lesson we will be looking at tone and image appreciation of charcoal and mixed-media artwork using shading, line and colour grounds to establish different tonal effects.

4. Embedding drawing fundamentals: Perspective

In today's lesson we will look at perspective-drawing fundamentals and image appreciation of perspective in art and you will work on one & two point quick perspective exercises to develop imaginary (or real) landscape & still life drawings.

5. Drawing techniques: Exploring textures

In today's lesson we will learn how to explore texture using mixed-media.

6. Drawing techniques: Expressive mark making

In today's lesson we will explore expressive mark making.


Unit: Media

1. What is pre-production?

This this lesson, you will be introduced to the concept of pre-production and some of the tools that are available to them in this process. You will also produce a client-let digital media product using the pre-production tools.

2. Creating digital graphics

In this lesson, learners will be introduced to the two main types of digital graphics — raster and vector — and the associated file formats for each type. Learners will then learn how to make use of two different open source applications for the creation of each type of graphic. Learners will be shown sources that they can use to create their own digital graphics, whilst following appropriate copyright law.

3. Creating digital video

In this lesson, learners will be introduced to the different types of camera angle that are used in video production. They will then learn about the properties of digital video, including frames per second, compression, and file formats. Learners will then use the open source video editing package OpenShot to create a short video piece using presupplied video assets.

Unit: Programming 3: Iteration

1. While loops

This lesson will introduce you to the world of iteration in programming. You will learn how to create and use a while loop in Python.

2. Trace tables

Testing is extremely important but sometimes it can be tricky to spot some errors and work out what is wrong. Trace tables are great for checking logic errors in your program, they are also a valuable tool for learning how to read and follow programs. In this lesson, you will learn what a trace table is and how to use one.

3. For loops

Continuing the theme of iteration, you will be introduced to another type of loop called a for loop. These allow you to iterate through a sequence. You will find out how to create and use one in this lesson.

4. Data validation

It is really important to make sure that you do as much as you can to avoid user error in your programs. Data validation has been touched on a little throughout Part 1 and Part 2 of the programming units. In this lesson you will take this a step further by applying data validation through iteration.

5. Pseudocode

Pseudocode is used to design programs. In this lesson, you will learn how to write your own pseudocode. You will also complete a challenging project that you will need to design using pseudocode before creating in Python.


Unit: Programming 4: Subroutines

1. Subroutines

In parts 1 to 3 of the Programming unit, you have already experienced subroutines. This lesson in designed to formalise your definition of a subroutine. You will find out why they are used in programming and you will also learn how to pass values to them.

2. Functions

Functions are a type of subroutine that allow you to return a value. You have used them before when you have used code like print() and input(). In this lesson you will explore how to create your own functions.

3. Scope

In this lesson you will learn about scope of variables. When a variable is initialised within a subroutine it cannot be easily accessed and modified by other subroutines. This lesson will teach you about the different levels of scope and show you how to access variables that are initialised within subroutines.

4. XOR

You should already be familiar with the operators AND, NOT and OR. This lesson introduces a new operator called XOR. You will discover how an XOR works before writing a function to perform the XOR operation.

5. Structured programming

Structured programming is a programming paradigm. This lesson introduces you to this paradigm and demonstrates how you can apply it to your own programs.

6. Create a program

In this lesson you will follow the structured programming approach to create your own program.

Unit: Holidays and travel

1. Talking about what you do in the summer (Part 1/3)

In this lesson we will revisit present tense regular '-AR' verbs in the context of holidays. We will look at conjugating verbs in order to be able to understand and express who is doing an action in a sentence.

2. Talking about what you do in the summer (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we will revisit present tense regular '-ER' and '-IR' verbs in the context of holidays. We will look at conjugating verbs in order to be able to understand and express who is doing an action in a sentence.

3. Talking about what you do in summer (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we will revisit present tense regular verbs in the context of holidays in order to be able to describe in detail what you and others do on holidays.

4. Talking about holiday likes and preferences (Part 1/3)

In this lesson we revisit how to use 'gustar'-type verbs with nouns and with other verbs. We will look at how 'gustar'-type verbs work differently from other verbs in Spanish in order to be able to express likes and dislikes in the context of holidays.

5. Talking about holiday likes and preferences (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we revisit how to use 'gustar'-type verbs when talking about someone else, in the context of holidays.

6. Talking about holiday likes and preferences (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we will learn about using a range of opinion-giving verbs in the context of holidays, including reasons with 'porque' and 'por eso'.

7. Talking about what you did on holiday (Part 1/3)

In this lesson, we will learn about the preterite with '-AR' verbs in the context of holidays in order to be able to talk about what you, and others do on holidays.

8. Talking about what you did on holiday (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we will learn about the preterite tense with some regular '-ER' and '-IR' verbs, so we can talk about what we did on holiday, but also what others did.

9. Talking about what you did on holiday (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we will build upon our understanding of the preterite tense and learn how to use 'gustar'-type verbs and some key irregular verbs. We will then look at how to improve the level of complexity in our speaking and writing.

10. Describing where you stayed (Part 1/3)

In this lesson we learn about verbs that have a reflexive and non-reflexive form, focusing on ‘alojarse’ and ‘quedarse’. We will also look at the imperfect tense of ‘estar’ and ‘haber’ so that you can describe where you stayed on holidays.

11. Describing where you stayed (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we learn about the imperfect tense with a range of irregular verbs (haber, tener, estar and ser) in the context of holidays so that we can give descriptions in the past.

12. Describing where you stayed (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we learn about the prenominal adjective ‘mucho’. We will also practise negative sentences with ni...ni and tampoco, building upon our understanding of the imperfect tense.

13. Talking about accommodation: reservations and problems (Part 1/3)

In this lesson we learn the difference between ‘me gustaría’ and ‘me gusta’, paying careful attention at how to use ‘me gustaría’ when booking accommodation. We will also practise asking yes / no questions in Spanish.

14. Talking about accommodation: reservations and problems (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we practise asking information questions using question words. We will also practise using ‘tú’ and ‘usted’ appropriately so that we can understand and use the formal mode of address when booking accommodation.

15. Talking about accommodation (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we learn how to use ‘cuánto’ (how much) and ‘cuántos’ (how many) to ask questions in the context of holidays. We will also do a role-play activity, one of the tasks in the speaking exam.

16. Giving an account of a holiday in the past (Part 1/3)

In this lesson we build upon our understanding of the preterite tense and we will learn how to use the 2nd person singular and plural form of the preterite tense. We will also consolidate the topic vocabulary so that you can recognise and ask key questions about a past event.

17. Giving an account of a holiday in the past (Part 2/3)

In this lesson we learn about translating ‘hacer’ and its multiple meanings. We will also look at how to use the imperfect and preterite tense together.

18. Giving an account of a holiday in the past (Part 3/3)

In this lesson we retrieve our knowledge of the present, preterite and imperfect tenses in the context of holidays. We will consolidate our understanding of how to use multiple tenses when giving an account of a holiday in the past through a reading task.

19. Guided Writing: Foundation

In this lesson we explore a foundation style GCSE writing question before co-constructing a written answer. There is an opportunity for you to practise some independent writing at the end of this lesson.

20. Guided Writing: Higher

In this lesson we explore a higher style GCSE writing question focusing on tense formation before co-constructing a written answer. There is an opportunity for you to practise some independent writing at the end of this lesson.

Unit: Urban change in Liverpool, UK

1. Location and importance of Liverpool

This lesson introduces the location of Liverpool and discusses the importance of the city nationally and internationally.

2. Impacts of migration on Liverpool

This lesson will consider the influence of both national and international migration on the culture of Liverpool.

3. Opportunities of urban change in Liverpool (Part 1)

This lesson explores the social and economic opportunities that have been created through urban growth in Liverpool

4. Opportunities of urban change in Liverpool (Part 2)

This lesson explores the environmental opportunities that have been created through urban growth in Liverpool.

5. Challenges of urban change in Liverpool (Part 1)

This lesson explores the social, economic and environmental challenges caused by urban change in Liverpool.

6. Challenges of urban change in Liverpool (Part 2)

This lesson explores the impacts of urban sprawl and counter-urbanisation on Liverpool.

7. An urban regeneration project in Liverpool: The Anfield project

This lesson will consider why regeneration is needed in Liverpool, and explore the main features of the Anfield regeneration project.

8. Sustainable urban living

This lesson explores the concept of sustainable urban living, with focus given to water, energy, waste and green space.

9. How urban transport strategies reduce traffic congestion

This lesson looks at the strategies used in Liverpool to reduce traffic congestion, with focus given to Liverpool City Bikes, pedestrianisation and park and ride schemes.

 

Unit: Atomic Structure

1. Exploring inside an atom

This lesson explores what an atom is made of, the internal structure of an atom, and the properties of the particles that make an atom.

2. Isotopes and ionisation

This lesson explores how the internal structure of an atom can change to make isotopes or ions.

3. History of atomic models

This lesson compares the plum pudding model with the nuclear model and explores the most significant experimental discovery that contributed to our modern model of the atom.

4. Radioactivity

This lesson looks at the properties of four different forms of radiation and how we could experimentally determine which radiation an isotope is producing.

5. Decay equations

This lesson explores the changes that take place within the nucleus of an atom during radioactive decay and we will learn how to write radioactive decay equations using atomic notation.

6. Activity and half-life (HT)

This lesson explores the pattern behind the randomness of radioactive decay, how the half-life of an isotope can be determined and how the proportion of nuclei lost can be determined.

7. Uses and hazards of radiation (Combined science only)

This lesson contrasts contamination and irradiation and explores some of the uses and dangers of radioactive sources by considering the properties of the radiations they produce and how they can be used in various situations.

8. Uses of radiation (Physics only)

This lesson will explore how we can use radioactive sources in a wide range of contexts, including within hospitals for imaging inside the body and treating disease.

9. Fission and fusion

This lesson will explore the processes of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion and how these important processes can, or could, be used for energy generation.

10. P4 atomic structure review (Part 1)

This lesson revises the Atomic Structure subject knowledge common to both GCSE Combined Science and GCSE Physics and gives an opportunity to work through some exam style questions.

11. P4 atomic structure review (Part 2)

This lesson revises the Atomic Structure subject knowledge on Half-life and the uses and hazards of radiation. This lesson also gives an opportunity to work through some exam style questions. It also covers Fission and Fusion which is only needed for the GCSE Physics course.


Unit: Bonding, structure and the properties of Matter

1. Ionic bonding introduction

This lesson will recap some relevant aspects of atomic structure and the rules for the formation of ions. It will then talk about formation of ionic bonds.

2. Further ionic bonding

This lesson will build on lesson one to show how to draw ionic compounds which are not a 1:1 ratio. It will also discuss how to write answers to these types of problems.

3. Properties of ionic compounds

This lesson will describe the properties of ionic compounds and how they can be explained by how ionic compounds form.

4. Covalent bonding

This lesson will introduce covalent bonding and explain why elements bond covalently.

5. Simple covalent molecules

This lesson will describe the bonding and properties of simple covalent molecules.

6. The giant covalent structures

This lesson will introduce giant covalent macromolecules and describe the physical properties of the main forms of carbon; graphite and diamond. It will link these properties to their bonding.

7. Giant covalent structures: Graphene

This lesson introduces the fullerene family of carbon compounds. It describes their structure and properties. It tells the story of the discovery of graphene and the scientists involved.

8. Polymers

This lesson will introduce the concept of polymers. You will be able to draw the displayed formula of monomers and polymers and link the structures to their properties.

9. Review (Part 1)

This lesson will review ionic and covalent bonding/ Compare and contrast the properties and uses of covalent bonding.

10. Metallic bonding

This lesson will introduce metallic bonding and link it to a metal's typical physical properties. It will then explain how forming an alloy changes these properties by linking to an alloy structure.

11. Solids, liquids and gases

This lesson will overlap with the particle model of matter from physics. It will discuss what happens when substances melt and boil. For higher tier it will explain why our models of particles are limited and the issues this can cause.

12. Nanoparticles (GCSE Chemistry only)

This lesson is only for students studying the separate Chemistry GCSE. It will introduce the concept of nanoparticles, describe their uses and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of their use.

13. Review (Part 2)

This lesson will review the three main types of bonding and their implications to the physical characteristics and uses of a substance.

Unit: Revisiting: Romeo and Juliet

1. Romeo (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will revisit the character of Romeo and consider how Shakespeare presents his character across the whole play. We will explore some of his key relationships in the text and consider some of the most important moments of his character's development.

2. Romeo (Part 2)

In this lesson, we will continue to explore Romeo's characterisation across the play. We will learn about the 'tragic hero' and consider the extent to which Shakespeare has presented Romeo as a typical tragic hero.

3. Juliet (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will revisit Juliet's character and consider how Shakespeare presents her across the play. We will explore key contextual ideas and consider to what extent Juliet can be considered to be a 'typical' Elizabethan woman.

4. Juliet (Part 2)

In this lesson, we continue to explore Juliet's characterisation across the play. We will consider her relationships with other key characters and comment on the development and metamorphosis of her character from Act 1 to Act 5.

5. Benvolio and Tybalt (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will explore the characterisation of Benvolio. We will consider Shakespeare's use of flat characterisation, and how he purposefully constructs Benvolio's character in order to create a sense of contrast within the narrative.

6. Benvolio and Tybalt (Part 2)

In this lesson, we will continue to explore flat characterisation used by Shakespeare, this time considering the character of Tybalt. We will comment on the central character traits that Tybalt demonstrates in the narrative, and consider the lesson that an audience can learn from this.

7. Love (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will explore how Shakespeare presents the theme of love in Romeo and Juliet. We will consider the literary method of motif, and examine how this is used by Shakespeare to demonstrate his message about love to an audience.

8. Love (Part 2)

In this lesson, we will continue to explore how Shakespeare presents the theme of love in Romeo and Juliet. We will revisit the contextual Elizabethan attitudes towards love and re-examine some of the most interesting interpretations of love that Shakespeare presents across his narrative.

9. Conflict (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will explore how Shakespeare presents the theme of conflict in Romeo and Juliet. We will again consider the literary method of motif, and examine how this is used by Shakespeare to demonstrate his message about conflict to an audience.

 

10Y Band: Unit: Expressions

1. Algebraic expressions

In this lesson you will be introduced to algebraic notation and learn how to evaluate and substitute into expressions.

2. Collecting like terms

In this lesson you will learn to collect together like terms and manipulate linear expressions.

3. Distributivity and expanding

In this lesson you will use the distributive property to expand brackets with linear expressions.

4. Factorising expressions

In this lesson you will learn how to factorise basic linear expressions.

5. Forming and exploring equations

In this lesson you will learn the concept of an equation and use models to form equations.

6. Exploring equality

In this lesson you will form equations and explore how equality is preserved.

7. Inequalities

In this lesson you will use models to form inequalities.

8. Further inequalities

In this lesson you will learn how to form inequalities related to a known equation.

9. Perimeter expressions

In this lesson you will learn how to form expressions using algebraic lengths and draw shapes given expressions for the perimeter.

10. Perimeter inequalities

In this lesson you will learn how to establish inequalities from perimeter expressions.

11. Counting strategies

In this lesson you will generalise counting strategies algebraically for repeating patterns.

12. Growing tree patterns

In this lesson you will learn how to generalise counting strategies algebraically for different repeating patterns.


10P Band: Unit: Algebra

1. Solving one-step equations

Solving one step equations including those that first need to be formed from a word problem.

2. Solving two-step equations

Solving two step equations including those that first need to be formed from a word problem.

3. Solving equations with brackets

Solving equations with brackets including those that first need to be formed from a word problem.

4. Solving equations with unknown on both sides

Solving equations with unknown on both sides including those that first need to be formed from a word problem.